The Economist: ‘What if Women Ruled The World?’- The World Would Be a Different Place?

The Economist - What if Women Ruled The World_ - Google Search

Source:The Economist– U.S. Representative Alexandria O. Cortez: Democratic Socialist, New York City 

Source:The New Democrat 

“Only 6.3% of all international leaders are women. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, former Liberian president and Africa’s first elected female head of state, suggests ways to redress the balance.”

Source:The Economist: ‘What If Women Ruled The World?’

To sort of have fun with President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf’s comment about the world would be a better place if women ruled the world: if you’re a regular of the so-called reality TV series Housewives, you might not think the world would be a safer place if women ruled the world. Most of the time they’re either arguing, swearing at each other, even physically fighting and throwing things at each other. Which might be the only reason why those shows are so popular with all the catfighting. A good so-called reality TV show makes the WWE look like a golf match: way too quiet and peaceful.

As far as women ruling the world and to take a more serious look at this: ( for a change ) the only way to achieve power in America or anywhere else in the world, is to achieve power. Which I know sort of sounds like Captain Obvious on his best day, but anything that’s worth doing is worth working for. You don’t achieve power in America or anywhere else by sitting at home or at some coffee house staring at your phone and hoping someone else does it for you. But instead you have to enter the free market of ideas ( also known as liberal democracy ) and put yourself out there and make to case to anyone who will hear you why you’re the most qualified candidate out there and should hold that office, instead of the man you are running against or perhaps another woman that you might be running against.

Some might argue ( like radical feminists ) that it’s hard for women to run office because of sexism and all the negative stereotypes women especially female candidates get about being tough and not seeming feminine enough and all of that: try making that case to Dr. Martin L. King and his civil rights movement of the 1960s: what if Dr. King believed that his civil rights movement wasn’t worth it because of all the violence and racism that he and his movement would face from those racist, Neo-Confederate state government’s in the South and decided: “the hell with it, this is not worth it.” You think America and the world would be different if women were in charge: imagine how different America would be if the African-American community was satisfied with living as second-class citizens and in some cases not even treated like citizens at all.

I realize the women’s movement ( whatever that is supposed to be today ) is not an exact parallel to the civil rights movement of the 1960s, but there are similarities in as far as what both movements were up against from the outset. And in the civil rights case and to a large extent with a lot of female candidates and female politicians today, a lot of these people knew that from the outset as well and decided that it was worth it and that just because they’re female that doesn’t make them any less qualified to hold public office than their male counterparts. Which is how 70 or more women get elected to Congress last year with most of those women getting elected to the House. ( You want more female Senators, they have to run for office first )

And I just get back to my first serious point to close this: anything in life regardless of which country it is that’s worth achieving in life is worth working for. Even if there are a lot of obstacles that are thrown at you and even unfair obstacles: like people being judged simply by their race, ethnicity, gender, etc. And a lot of times you need those thoroughbreds from the outset who don’t completely throw caution to the wind, but knows exactly what’s in front of them and takes it on anyway with a game plan to accomplish their goals. You don’t win games by sitting on the sidelines. And you don’t win elections and get elected by sitting at home.

About Erik Schneider

Full-time blogger on a multiple ray of topics and subjects, because of multiple interests.
This entry was posted in The Economist and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.